Problems with wicd-curses on Fedora 20

If you’re on Fedora 20, are trying to run wicd-curses, and keep getting errors like the one below:

..then the fix is simple. Open up the file /usr/share/wicd/curses/curses_misc.py, go to line 360, and paste the following below:

wicd-curses should be working again. This is currently a bug on Bugzilla (https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=894646).

Problems with XBMC-audio on Apple TV 2

I have an Apple TV 2 that I’ve installed XBMC on. For a while it was working great, but out of the blue suddenly the sound got choppy. I guess there was an update that changed something. The best description I have for it is that the audio sounded like a machine gun – very annoying! And made movies unwatchable. Luckily, there’s a way to fix this. You simply need to change some of the XBMC-settings.

Go to:

  • System
  • System
  • Audio output
  • Check/uncheck Dolby Digital AC3 and DTS as capable receivers

This should do the trick! It certainly worked for me, so sure hope it works for you.

Continue enjoying your movies and series!

Introduction to strace

There will come a time when you will find yourself asking “What the heck is that process doing?”. To uncover the mysteries behind the behaviour of a process, we have a tool called strace.

The program strace is very handy when you want to debug the execution of a program. It catches and states all the system calls performed called by a process. It will also catch and state any inter-process signals received by this process.

Let’s dive into some examples.

Trace the execution

..is the simple straight-forward way to use it. The output might look something like:

The output looks a bit messy, but it can provide very useful information like which files does this program use, what is this program doing right now or why does this program not read the config file – does it even look for it?

Attach to an existing process

You can run strace on a process that’s already running. Use -p, and provide the Process ID (PID):

The output presented to you is similar to the example above. Notice that you can only trace a process you have access rights to. Multiple -p options will also trace these processes with a limit of 32 processes that strace can attach to.

Trace child processes

Use -f to trace child processes as they are created by currently traced processes. This is useful for debugging a program that spawns children. strace will prepend the pid of the traced process output:

Trace specific system calls

The e-flag, along with the call open, displays only open system calls of the ls command, which outputs something along these lines:

With the above example, close to the end, you can see two things – ghost and ghost.zip, a folder and file, which is the actual output of the command ls.

A few of the options available after -e trace= are:

  • open
  • close
  • read
  • write

Trace multiple system calls

What if you want to trace multiple system calls in one command though? The option -e trace= can take a comma separated set of systemcalls as argument:

Which outputs:

Write output to file

If you’d like to write the output of strace to a file, add a -o:

When you print the contents of ls.txt, you’ll see that it contains only the output from strace, and not from the command ls:

Add a timestamp

If you add a -t to the command, you’ll be able to add a timestamp to each printed line. You can add up to 3 -t‘s. The more you add, the more verbose and detailed the timestamp will be.

One -t shows you seconds:

Adding a second -t will display microseconds:

A third -t will include the microseconds and the leading portion will be printed as the number of seconds since the epoch.

Print relative timestamp

If you’d like to find out the execution time of each call, -r will certainly do the trick:

A summary of system calls

Would you like to have a summary of calls, time, and errors for each system call? -c does this:

This option is very useful when trying to find out why a program is running slow.

Introduction to lsof

Today I’m going to introduce you to the exciting world of lsof.

As you will see, it’s a nifty little tool that has various uses, and it has so many switches that you need both a and a + to use all the options available! As the description of the command says in its man-page:

lsof – list open files

So, let’s get started.

Network

List network connections

Continue reading

urxvt and urlLauncher not working

I recently found myself having problems with urxvt. In my configuration-file, .Xdefaults, I had the following lines set up:

This would enable urxvt to highlight a link in white, and when clicking it would launch the URL in to a tab of my browser of choice. But one day it suddenly stopped working, for no apparent reason. After a little digging, I found the following in urxvt’s changelog, http://cvs.schmorp.de/rxvt-unicode/Changes:

– INCOMPATIBLE CHANGE: renamed urlLauncher resource to url-launcher.

Changing URxvt.urlLauncher to URxvt.url-launcher in .Xdefaults seemed to fix the problem!